Mrs Hinch And Her HinchArmy Instagram Sensation - We Are Over It at Digital 24 in Belfast

Instafamous Mrs Hinch – The ‘Instagrammer’ We Are So Over

Domesticating Instagram

When we think of social media channels, we associate each one with a particular type of content. Loosely speaking (arguments welcome), Facebook is where we share updates with friends and family, Twitter is a news source and echo chamber while LinkedIn is the home of professional shouting.

The “new kid on the block” {used loosely but the channel seeing a huge growth explosion} – Instagram – is the home of visuals, short ‘stories’ and brightly coloured #LifeGoals. But recently, Instagram has found a new focal point; bleach. Or #instacrime as we like to call to it. 

Cleaning Up

Yes, the latest trend of cleaning videos, led by @mrshinchhome_x_ and her #HinchArmy, has caused a stir. Admittedly though, Instagram has always headed in a house proud direction, think of the #HouseTour and #InteriorInspo trends. Toilet duck enthusiasts could claim cleaning videos are a ‘making of’ for these perfect homes. In our humble opinions – this crap is not ‘Instagrammable’. We do not want to be looking down your bog first thing in the morning. The place you probably just took a shit in minutes before. No. No. No. It’s an #instacrime and it has got to stop. 

Despite what we think, this phenonomen {if that’s what it can be classified as} has found its way to the Daily Mail, daytime TV and trended on multiple platforms. So why has this trend, deemed archaic by some and invigorating by others, caused such a fuss?

Sexism

Yes, the cleaning videos have upset the masses and held up a beacon of sexism (not to mention the rise of people purchasing products full of chemicals). One Twitter user pointed out that Sophie Hinch targets women writing, ‘Cleaning is NOT just for girls for f0cksake WHY IS DAY TO DAY SEXISM FROM OTHER WOMAN STILL A THING’. @Harriet3949 also criticised Hinch’s sales pitch, noting they regularly include ‘Swipe up to buy Girls’. (no #ad mind you … if you know, you know). 

Others have questioned Mr Hinch’s role in keeping his home tidy. One post showed how he watches football while the, now famous, Instagrammer cleans. He also starred in a story, named Mr Hinch, which highlighted his apparent inability to clean a sink to his wife’s standards (don’t get us started!). Across social media, people have questioned if #Hinching is a digital take on outdated roles.

#HinchArmy

Despite the negative press, it has been the overwhelming positive posts that have supported the new trend. @mrshinchhome_x_ has even found her way onto our larger screens, claiming a morning slot on This Morning, where she doles out cleaning tips. Her loyal #HinchArmy also point out the positive health benefits of a clean home and how she has inspired them. There’s no doubt that some people will feel genuinely refreshed after some #hinching, surely that’s good.

Lastly, Sophie Hinch has built a bond with her supporters who regularly sing her praises online. The mutual love peaked when she was hospitalised, and people sent her messages of support. The relationship between Mrs Hinch and her fans feels like one of the web’s warmer stories. Despite this, her fans can become a bit over-zealous, portraying her detractors as cynical trolls who probably live in messy caves.

Hinchy do you love me?

On a daily basis, millions visit Instagram to be inspired, to find new ideas and follow trends. From hairstyles, figures, cars, tans, goals, homes even dogs the platform offers up endless must-haves and often unachievable lifestyles. But, having a clean house is more realistic than having your favourite celeb’s cars or wardrobe, at least it’s achievable.

Maybe though, Mr Hinch could step up or get involved. Or, Mrs Hinch could adopt a more modern tone and plug more sinks and less cleaning products. Either way, her message will do well to see 2019 (we’ve all unfollowed her already), but not because some call it old-fashioned or sexist. Realistically, Insta trends are short-lived, expect people to go back to ‘cleaning’ and not ‘hinching’ their toilet bowls quite soon.